Category: A

Bacillary Dysentery – Characteristics and History

Bacteria from several genera, including Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia, as well as some strains of the common intestinal bacillus Escherichia coli, can invade mucosa of the large intestine and cause dysentery, but members of...

Ascariasis – Characteristics and History

The giant intestinal roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, is a common parasite with worldwide distribution. Adult worms are 15–35 cm (6–14 inches) long and reside in the lumen of the small intestine. Sometimes, however, they are...

Arthritis (Rheumatoid) – Characteristics and History

Rheumatoid arthritis, the major crippling illness among chronic rheumatic disorders, is a systemic disease affecting joints with an inflammatory reaction lasting months or years. Frequently, the small joints of hands and feet are affected...

Apoplexy and Stroke – Characteristics and History

The old, very popular, and quite international term apoplexy (or its equivalents “apoplectic attack,” “apoplectic ictus,” and “ictus”) today generally means stroke. The word “apoplexy” comes from the Greek meaning “stroke” and “to strike.”...

Anthrax – Characteristics and History

Anthrax is an acute zoonotic disease, primarily of herbivorous animals, which is transmissible to humans. The causative organism is Bacillus anthracis, often referred to in earlier, and especially in French, texts as bact´eridie, the...

Anorexia Nervosa – Characteristics and History

Anorexia nervosa is a psychophysiological disorder especially prevalent among young women and characterized by refusal to eat or maintain normal body weight, intense fear of becoming obese, a disturbed body image in which the...

Amebic Dysentery – Characteristics and History

Amebiasis is an infection of the colon caused by a parasitic protozoan, the ameba Entamoeba histolytica. Several species of ameba inhabit the large intestine. Most are harmless commensals or minor parasites, usually causing little...